Ag Day - Saturday 2 October

Te Hihi School Virtual Ag Day

Kia ora koutou

We first want to acknowledge that many students have put a lot of time, effort and commitment into raising animals this year. It is such a shame that due to the COVID-19 Delta outbreak our Ag Day will not be going ahead. We are having to move to a virtual Ag Day.

As this is the second year in a row that Ag Day has been adversely affected by Covid-19, we are looking at holding an event in Term 4 for the whole community to come together.

Animals

We will retain the Best Name category despite moving to a virtual Ag Day. This will be judged as it would normally be and there will be a 1st ribbon for the animal with the best name.

For the animal section, whānau are invited to submit videos of students with their animals as follows.

Ag Day Activities

The following are the criteria for the videos:

· There must be just one take of the video and the video must include both aspects listed below in the one take. On a normal Ag Day there are no second attempts.

· For the chooks, lambs and kid goats, the video must start with the student calling the animal then go straight into the trick or leading.

· The person videoing must video from the centre of the course.

· The video needs to be taken on either Friday 1 October, Saturday 2 October or Sunday 3 October and uploaded to the DropBox folder (see below) by Monday 4 October.

· Students with chickens, the video must include

o The chicken being called from 5m away. A family member is allowed to hold the chicken until the student starts calling it. The student isn’t allowed to have food in their hand.

o The chicken doing a trick. All tricks must be humane.

· Students with lambs and goats, the video must include

o The lamb/goat being called from 10m away. A family member is allowed to hold the lamb/goat until the student starts calling it. The student isn’t allowed to have anything in their hand to entice the lamb/goat.

o The lamb/goat being led around a course as set out below.

· Students with a calf, the video must include

o The students talking about how they have cared for their calf.

o The calf being led around a course as set out below.

Get Creative

It’s time to get creative with your animal and show us how well you’ve bonded with your animal. This is one for your whole family to get involved with and have a bit of fun. You might like to pretend to be having dinner with your animal, going on holiday, have them doing some school work, etc. Once you’ve decided what you’re going to do, make a short video of your creative genius of no longer than 3 minutes. You are allowed to shoot as many ‘takes’ as you need to, add commentary, costumes, backing music, or whatever you like. You don’t have to wait until the last day of term to make this video - you can start working on this straight away. Remember, your animal’s welfare must come first and this will be taken into consideration by the judges.

Uploading Videos

Log into dropbox.com using the username agday@tehihi.school.nz and password AgDay2021.

Open the folder Ag Day 2021 Videos

Click on the Upload button

Select Files

Navigate to where you have saved the file on your computer

Click on the file and then click on Choose file

The upload will start.

Click on the black circle in the top right hand side

And click on sign out.

Please do not send your videos by email to the above address – it is not monitored and they won’t be judged

Judging of Animal Videos

A judging panel of four staff will review and judge all videos according to the normal Ag Day groupings as follows:

Chickens

· Junior (Y0-3)

· Intermediate (Y4-6)

· Senior (Y7-8)

Lambs

· Junior (Y0-3)

· Intermediate/Senior (Y4-8)

Kid goats

· One section only

Calves

· Junior (Y0-3)

· Intermediate (Y4-6)

· Senior (Y7-8)

Creative Video

· Junior

· Intermediate

· Senior

The winning entries will be shown at the first school assembly once it is safe for the school to hold assemblies again.

Projects

Students who have not raised an animal were asked to complete a project. Given we have been in Alert Level 4 for the last half of the term, completing the project is now optional. A link to the project requirements can be accessed by clicking on headings below or going through to the school’s website here. The project is to be submitted electronically to the class email address by 1 October.

Year 0-2

· The picture diary and a photo of their Grass Head is to be submitted to blake-hillary@tehihi.school.nz

Year 3-4

· If the presentation has been completed by hand, photographs of the handwritten and drawn project along with a photo of the 3D model are to be submitted to taylor@tehihi.school.nz

· If the presentation has been completed electronically on a computer, the electronic files are to be submitted along with a photo of the 3d model to taylor@tehihi.school.nz

Year 5-8

· A video of the scientific experiment and the written aspect of the experiment must be submitted to tekanawa@tehihi.school.nz (Year 5&6) or rutherford@tehihi.school.nz (Year 7&8)

Prizes

Prizes for the animal videos and projects will include 1st, 2nd and 3rd ribbons and merit ribbons which will be presented at the first full school assembly. We will not be awarding cups this year.

Issues and Problems

We appreciate that there will be some challenges with video entries; if you have any issues uploading your video, please don’t hesitate to contact Kevin, kevinb@tehihi.school.nz 027 292 7706. If you have concerns around the Virtual Ag Day format, please don't hesitate to email Gina, (gbeck@coca-cola.com), Sandy (sandyangelaharman@gmail.com) or Kevin (kevinb@tehihi.school.nz)

Re-homing chickens

For whānau wishing to re-home their chicken, this can only be arranged in Alert Level 2. Once we move to Alert Level 2 we will provide details of who is facilitating the re-homing of the chickens and where they are to be dropped to.


Course

If you don’t have a cone or pigtail standard as depicted below, use whatever else you have. The course is made up of three sides, the first is a zig-zag leg to demonstrate the animal following on the lead, the second needs to demonstrate the student’s ability to bring their animal to a stop an lead on, the third is to lead the animal over an obstacle such as a log of wood.

What is Ag Day?


Our Agricultural Day is one of the few significant historical days and traditions still existing at Te Hihi School and identifies us as a country school within the local community. The purpose of Ag Day is to promote and encourage children to care and be responsible for an animal.

It is also a family day. Grandparents, aunts, uncles, mums, dads and members of our community are invited to come along, watch the children show their animals and view the horticultural option. The day runs from approximately 9:00 am to 2:00 pm on the first Saturday of the October holiday break.


In 2020, due to Auckland being at Covid-19 Alert Level 2 our Ag Day was a vey scaled back day. We wait to see what happens in 2021.

Information

Ag Day is an opportunity for students to have fun rearing and getting to know their animals. We encourage all animals to be named early so

that they get used to their name!

Animals need to be fed and cared for well. If you have any questions on raising them please phone the person in this booklet who can help answer your questions.


Students who do not enter an animal must complete an Ag Day project.

Animal Selection

Our Ag Day animals are restricted to those listed below as these are the traditional farmyard animals that children can rear from birth.

For the first time this year we are introducing dogs and rabbits for children to bring along. See the following drop downs on how to care for each of the four animals.

Calves born between 01 June and 24 July

Kid Goats born between 01 May and 24 July

Lambs born between 01 May and 24 July

Chickens purchased through the school - no other chicken entries are permitted.

Judged Age Groups

The children compete in the following age groups.

Age of child to be taken as at 1st November of this Ag Day year.


Junior: 5 years old to 7 years old on the 1st November

Intermediate: 8 years old to 10 years old on the 1 November

Senior: 11 years old and over on the 1st November.


Judging Categories

Calves

Rearing, leading, dairy or beef types.

Calf breed definitions are as follows:

Light Dairy = Jersey & Ayrshire;

Heavy Dairy = Friesian & Shorthorn;

Beef = Hereford, Angus, Friesian Cross, Murray Grey, Galloway;

Exotic = Simmental & Belgium Blue.

Lambs & Kid Goats

Rearing, leading, calling and best pet (bond between the child and animal).

Chickens

Rearing, calling, trick and best pet (bond between the child and animal).

Judging

Children must stay with their animals while judging is in progress. This applies to all animals. Once judging is complete children are free to go and enjoy the rest of Ag Day.

Judges' decisions are final and there is to be NO conferring with judges. If your child becomes distressed in the ring parents must ask the Judge or Head Steward if they may enter.

Badges

A badge reflecting the number of years they have had an animal at Ag Day is presented to Year 8 students at the end of the current year. These are only issued to students who have reared more than three animals. When children transfer from other rural schools their previously accumulated years of participation can be transferred on request.

Cups And Trophies

Some of our cups and trophies are very old and we ask students and parents to take care of them, to ensure they are cleaned and polished with SILVO (silver polish only). Using Brasso damages the surface and causes the cups to yellow. FOTHS (Friends of Te Hihi School, our parent group) will also ensure maintenance and repairs are carried out.

Concerns About Animals

If at any time you have concerns about your animal's health contact your local vet when

the concern occurs. They are happy to give advice over the phone regarding whether your animal requires treatment.


The Parent's Role In Ag Day

The success of our Te Hihi School Ag Day comes from the wonderful support of you, our parents, supporting your children with their animals, horticultural option and classroom exhibits, donating items for the raffles and baking and, of course, helping on the day. It's a huge ask but that's what we do at Te Hihi School for our children and our school. Please donate a small amount of time to help on the day by filling in the parent help form this will be going out in Term 3.

Franklin Central Group Day (date to be advised)

This is yet another historical day organised by members of the Franklin community. It enables students to compete with their calf, lamb or goat against other students from the Franklin area. All children who have entered an animal in our school's Ag Day can enter with the same animal. There is a minimal cost of $3 per child to enter which needs to be paid to the school office by the Friday before the day. The judging criteria is basically the same as Ag Day. Ribbons are given out for 1st, 2nd and 3rd in the various categories and champion ribbons and cups are given out at the end of the day. There are team events for leading in groups of three and ribbons are also awarded for 1st , 2nd and 3rd.

The Ray Wright Memorial Shield is presented annually to the school scoring the greatest number of points (points are awarded for each ribbon won on the day). The more entries from our school the better our chances! The Ararimu Shield is presented annually to the school scoring best average points for their number of entries.

Parents who attend Group Day are always happy to help other parents with transport for children and their animals and contact details are provided in the school newsletter.

The day runs between 9:30 am and 2:00 pm approximately. The school requires two volunteers to act as animal stewards on the day. You can indicate which animal you would prefer to steward and we would appreciate your help in this area. A volunteer is also required to assist in the kitchen for 30 minutes (9:00 am - 9:30 am) to set up plates, cups, saucers and food for the judges. If you are able to help with either of these tasks, please contact one of the members of the Ag Day Committee listed at the beginning of this booklet.



What To Expect

Leading Up To Ag Day

Whilst Ag Day is a day for children and their animal, it is an opportunity for FOTHS to raise some funds for the school. One of the key fundraisers

is the grocery raffle. During Term 3 parents will be asked to donate groceries with each week a different type of grocery item. Early September each family will be sent home two books of raffle tickets to sell. Please support this fundraiser as in recent years parents have contributed freely which has meant that we have been able to have ten raffle prizes.


With Ag Day on the last Saturday of Term 3, the final week of the term 3 is all about getting ready for Ag Day.


On The Day

Essentially there are three parts to the day.

  • Judging of the animals takes place from 9:00 a.m. and carries on until approximately 11:00 a.m.

  • While the officials tally up the points there will be food available and classroom exhibits to visit.

  • Once the results are tallied, the prize giving is held at approximately 1:00 p.m. followed by the Grand Parade of Animals at 1:30 p.m.

Food and other items are available for purchase throughout the day so you will need to have some money.

Chicken Rearing Guide

Chickens For Agricultural Day Are Purchased Through The School Only.

These chickens are six week old pullets and are available to be picked up from school in July. You are asked to order these in advance at a cost of $8.00 and they will be delivered to the school on Friday 29 July. Additional chickens are available for sale if

required. Cat cages or boxes are required on the day of pickup to take your chicken home.

Note: chickens are not to be taken home on the school buses.

Approx. Rearing Needs

Poultry mash or starter crumbs, pellets, suitable water and feeding dish.

Feeding


Feed your chicken as much pellets or mash as they like. Have a constant fresh clean water supply.

Household food scraps (bread, greens, etc.).

They will also eat grass, worms and grubs if allowed to roam the garden. Oyster grit is also good for them.

Housing Requirements


A warm dry house with a perch and nesting area is required. This will protect the chicken from dogs and cats. Let your chicken roam the garden during the day but shut it in the coop at night for safety.

Judging


The ribbons are presented for 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th in each of the three age groups - Junior, Intermediate and Senior. Then an overall winner is chosen based on judging points in the following categories.

Calling - the steward holds your chicken. When called it must come to you from a distance of 3 metres and be caught easily without frightening it.

Rearing - chickens are the same age when given out so they are looking for the best condition and growth presented on the day.

Best trick - demonstrate a trick you can do with your chicken and tell the judge what you particularly like about your chicken. Props can be used in the trick, e.g. rope, skateboards, prams, clothing, boxes - just use your imagination.

Tips For Success

  • The more you handle and spend time with your chicken the better the bond.

  • Name your chicken quickly and use the name as much as possible.

  • Ensure the chicken has a constant food supply for optimum growth.

  • Get the chicken eating grain or a particular food it likes out of your hand, which will help when training it for calling.

Goat Rearing Guide

Your Chosen Kid Goat Must Be Born Between 1st Of May and 24th Of July

Kids can be located via the Trade and Exchange, Trade-Me, breeder's web sites or local contacts by asking around. If possible buy from the farm of birth.


The Kid should be chosen no earlier than 3 days after birth but preferably 5 days after birth. This allows the kid to have its mother's colostrum, which gives protection against diseases and is high in both vitamins and minerals.


On occasion kids have been rejected by their mother or are one of triplets, in which case one is removed from its mother, as she is not able to adequately feed 3 of them. In these cases the kid may not have received colostrum. The healthy kid should have a dry small navel, lively movements, and clear bright eyes.

If a buck (male) is chosen he should be weathered with a rubber ring from 1 week old, otherwise he will become smelly and possibly aggressive as he reaches maturity. Ensure both testicles are down before releasing the ring.

Take note of your kid goat's date of birth, as this is required on your entry form.

Approx. Rearing Needs


2 x 10kg bags of milk powder, 2 x lamb teats (always pays to have a spare as they are chewed) or a complete bottle and teat + spare teat. Pellets or calf meal (from approx 3-4 weeks). Collar, lead and brush. Drench and vaccine.

Cover (optional): lamb or dog covers work well.

Feeding

Anlamb or Denkavit lamb milk powders are specially formulated to meet the needs of your kid goat. Lamb/goat teats can be screwed onto a coke or water bottle or complete lamb/goat feeding bottles are available from farming outlet stores & vet clinics. (Profarm in Papakura, Wrightsons, RD1 or Farmlands in Pukekohe).

Mixing and feeding instructions are clearly written on the bag. Avoid sudden changes in the type (brand), quantity or temperature of milk or milk powder. For best results milk feed your goat until Ag Day.

When feeding your goat in the first 5 days, watch that its tummy doesn't get over distended. As a guide feed 20% of body weight daily split into 5 small feeds, e.g. a 3kg kid needs 600mls per day fed at 120 mls per feed. Thoroughly clean bottles and teats after each feed. Check teat for wear so it does not break off while feeding.


Supplement the milk with a lamb or multifeed pellet and keep moving your goat so that it has access to fresh grass everyday. Your goat (depending on how old) should be around 10kg by Ag Day.

Scours


If your kid goat scours:

  • Stop feeding it milk immediately and keep it off milk for 24 hours.

  • Feed it an electrolyte mix to keep it hydrated. Electrolyte mix is available in small pack sizes from your local farm store or vet and are always good to have on hand when rearing an Ag Day animal.

  • Give it a scour treatment. An easily given oral is Scourban, available from your vet.

  • Keep it in a clean, dry drought-free environment and keep warm. Hot water bottles are great or a lamb cover.

  • Return to milk feeds on the second day but continue the Scourban.


Important Note: Poisonous Plants


Goats have a love of garden plants. Unfortunately they are not able to determine which ones are poisonous. Many plants that are potentially poisonous or have poisonous parts are found in our gardens at home. Here are some examples:

  • Box (Buxus) and its relations such as the Allegheny spurge used for ground cover. Also many plants in the forget-me-not family which have harsh bristly leaves and bracken or rarauhe.

  • Members of the erica or rhododendron family, e.g. calico bush and its close relations.

  • Camelia, dahpne, azalea, daffodil, delphinium ferns, snowflake and snowdrop, hyacinths, hemlock, cress, red maple, oak, oleander, arums, ivy and five finger, swan plant, heathers and rhododendrons, lilies, poppies, clematis, cyclamen, poinsettia,

  • hemlock, titoki, fox-gloves and snapdragons and rhubarb leaves.

  • Many species in the large legume or pea family and the rose, peach and apple family are poisonous to some extent.

Vaccination And Drenching


If the mother of your kid goat was not vaccinated with a 5 in 1 one month prior to kidding or if you do not know if it was vaccinated the kid should be vaccinated with a lamb vaccine or PK/Antitiet from 1 week old (available from a vet).


If the goat has come from a vaccinated mother and has had adequate colostrum in the first day of its life it will have protection for about 3 months.


Your kid should also be vaccinated with a 5 in 1 vaccine at weaning (3 mths), given a

booster shot 1 month later and thereafter once a year. This vaccine prevents pulpy kidney disease, tetanus, black disease, malignant odema and blackleg.


Drench at about 4 weeks old and again at 10 weeks. An oral lamb drench is suitable for goats. Note: a separate drench is required to cover lice.

Lice Control


Lice are a common problem. Wash with Asuntol at twice weekly intervals and brush daily to remove the dead eggs. If your kid gets lice you also need to wash its cover & brush in Asuntol. Keep infected kids and gear away from other kids.

Housing Requirements


A dry draught-free house or kennel is required. You may even want to make a cover for your kid goat. It will grow better if it is not using energy to keep warm. A dog cover is ideal while it is small.


Daily Care

  • Regular feeding.

  • Wash its face to remove any milk residue.

  • Walk it on a lead and play with it.

  • Brush it at least once a day.

Points To Remember

  • Hooves should be trimmed and clean.

  • Hair around the hooves should be clipped.

  • Make sure your pet's face and ears are cleaned.

  • Trim long hair under its tail.

  • Brush it often to get a nice finish on the coat and remove loose hair.

  • Ensure the collar is loosened regularly so it is not too tight, otherwise it will wear the hair off around its neck.

  • Goats can be washed, preferably using animal wash.

Judging


The ribbons are presented for 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th in the following categories.

  • Rearing - condition of the kid goat, no loose hair, shiny coat.

  • Calling - kid goats need to come directly to you when called from a minimum distance of 4-5 metres (this distance will vary depending on the judge) and the child must be able to hook its lead back on.

  • Leading - your goat needs to walk on your right side through the course without any dragging, pushing or touching the piece of wood with its hooves when it steps over. Best Pet - bond between the kid goat and the child. Observed throughout the day.

Tips For Success

  • The child should always feed the goat. Mum or dad can assist younger children if needed.

  • Give your goat a treat when leading and calling. Use pellets or they often like raisins and bread (save the crusts and stale bread). Even a hug, pat and a few kind words are beneficial.

  • Spend lots of time with your goat so you build a bond and it will come when called.

  • Set up a course up at home and walk your goat daily. Your goat should be walking on your right. Make sure you include a small fence post or piece of wood in your course so the goat gets used to stepping over it. They mustn't touch the wood. Some judges at Franklin Group Day believe a well trained goat will walk any course with you if you have put in the time; so have on occasion in the past made the animals walk it backwards. Walk your goat anywhere around your property, the more often the better.

  • Your child should know the breed, age and general feeding requirements (how many times a day it is being fed) of the goat as some judges will ask.

On The Day

  • Wash your goat on or before Ag Day and take a bucket, brushes, an old towel to clean it if it is dirty when you arrive.

  • Ensure you have its food and water requirements for the day.

  • Please check your animal regularly when tethered at school to ensure they do not get tangled or distressed.

  • You will be issued with a number - try to remember your number and listen for it during judging.


Lamb Rearing Guide

Your Chosen Lamb Must Be Born Between 1st Of May and 24th Of July

Lambs are usually found via local contacts. Check at the school office for anyone that may have notified the school of availability of lambs.


The lamb should be chosen no earlier than 3 days after birth but preferably 5 days after birth. This allows the lamb to have its mother's colostrum, which gives protection against diseases and is high in both vitamins and minerals.


On occasion lambs have been rejected by their mother, orphaned or are one of triplets, in which case one is removed from the mother as she is not able to adequately feed 3 of them. In these cases the lamb may not have received colostrum. Colostrum can be purchased in a powdered form at farming outlets if needed. The healthy lamb should have a dry small navel, lively movements and clear bright eyes.


Your lamb will need to have its tail docked (a rubber ring placed around the tail). This can be done from a week old. The sooner this is done the better before the tail gets too big.


If a ram (male) is chosen he should be weathered with a rubber ring from 1 week old, otherwise he will possibly become aggressive as he reaches maturity. Ensure both testicles are down before releasing the ring.

Feeding

There are a variety of lamb milk powders available that are specially formulated to meet the needs of your lamb. Lamb teats that can screw onto a coke or water bottle or complete lamb feeding bottles are available from farming outlet stores & vet clinics. (Profarm in Papakura, Wrightsons, RD1 or Farmlands in Pukekohe).


Mixing and feeding instructions are clearly written on the bag. Avoid sudden changes in the type (brand), quantity or temperature of milk or milk powder.


For best results milk feed your lamb until Ag Day. When feeding your lamb in the first 5 days, watch that its tummy doesn't get over distended. As a guide feed 20% of body weight daily split into 5 small feeds, e.g. a 3kg lamb needs 600mls per day fed at 120 mls per feed. Thoroughly clean bottles and teats after each feed. Also check teats for wear.


Supplement the milk with a lamb or multifeed pellet and, if your lamb is tethered, keep moving it regularly so that it has access to fresh grass.


Approx Rearing Needs

  • 2 x 10kg bags of milk powder.

  • 2 x lamb teats (always pay to have a spare as they get chewed) or a complete bottle and teat + spare teat .

  • Lamb or multifeed pellets (lamb pellets also available by kg at some stores). Collar and lead (varying sizes and types available). Drench and vaccine. Cover (optional).

Scours

If your lamb scours:

  • Stop feeding it milk immediately and keep it off milk for 24 hours.

  • Feed it an electrolyte mix to keep it hydrated. Electrolyte mix is available in small pack sizes from your local farm store or vet and are always good to have on hand when rearing an Ag Day animal.

  • Give it a scour treatment (an easily given oral is Scourban, available from your vet).

  • Keep it in a clean, dry drought free environment and keep warm (hot water bottles are great) or a lamb cover.

  • Return to milk feeds on the second day but continue the Scourban.

Vaccination And Drenching

If the mother of your lamb was not vaccinated with a 5 in 1 one month prior to lambing or if you do not know if it was vaccinated the lamb should be vaccinated with a lamb vaccine or PK/Antitiet from 1 week old. (Available from the vet)


If the lamb has come from a vaccinated mother and has had adequate colostrum in the first day of its life it will have protection for about 3 months.


Your lamb should also be vaccinated with a 5 in 1 vaccine at weaning (or 3 mths), then given a booster shot 1 month later and thereafter once a year. This vaccine prevents pulpy kidney disease, tetanus, black disease, malignant oedema and blackleg. These diseases can kill the healthiest and largest of lambs. Drench at about 6 weeks old and again at 10 weeks. An oral lamb drench is available in a 200ml bottle from your local farming outlet. Note this drench does not cover lice.

Housing Requirements

A dry, draught-free house or kennel is required. Lamb covers are available for about $4 - $5 from your local farm outlet. Sudden changes in temperature when it is small can cause pneumonia and it will grow better if it is not using energy to keep warm.


Daily Care

  • Regular feeding.

  • Wash its face to remove any milk residue.

  • Walk it on a lead and play with it.

  • If you need to clean your lamb use water only (no detergents or bleaches). Your lamb has natural oil which protects it from water and cold. By washing it you are removing its protection.

Points To Remember

  • Lambs should NOT be brushed or washed - this is an instant disqualification.

  • Hooves should be trimmed and clean.

  • Trim any dags to tidy up around the lambs rear end.

  • Make sure your pet's face and ears are clean.

Judging

The ribbons are presented for 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th in each of the three age groups - Junior, Intermediate and Senior. Then an overall winner is chosen based on judging points in the following categories.

Rearing - general appearance, condition, size with the lamb's age taken into consideration. DO NOT BRUSH OR WASH YOUR LAMB.

Calling - your lamb needs to come directly to you when called from a minimum distance of 7-8 metres (this distance will vary depending on the judge) and the child must be able to hook its lead back on.

Leading - your lamb needs to walk on your right side through the course without any

dragging, pushing or touching the piece of wood with its hooves when it steps over. Best Pet - bond between the lamb and the child. Observed throughout the day.

Tips For Success

  • The child should always feed the lamb, mum or dad can assist younger children if needed. It is important to ensure the milk is mixed correctly.

  • Give your lamb a treat when leading and calling. Use the pellets or they often like raisins. Even a hug, pat and a few kind words are beneficial.

  • Spend lots of time with your lamb so you build a bond and it will come when called.

  • Set a course up at home and walk your lamb daily. Make sure you include a small fence post or piece of wood so the lamb gets used to stepping over it. Walk your lamb anywhere around your property as the more practice they have the better.

  • Your child should know the breed, age and general feeding requirements (how many times a day it is being fed) of the lamb as some judges will ask.

On The Day

  • Take a bucket, and an old towel to wipe it (using water only) if it is dirty when you arrive.

  • Ensure you have its food and water requirements for the day.

  • Please check you animal regularly when tethered at school to ensure they do not get tangled or distressed.

  • You will be issued with a number - try to remember your number and listen for it during judging.


Calf Rearing Guide

Your Chosen Calf Must Be Born Between The 1st Of June and The 24th Of July

Calves are best sourced from a local farmer. Buy a healthy calf that is at least 4 days old that has been well fed on colostrum. Look for small dry navels, pricked up ears, firm faeces, clear bright eyes, moist noses, shiny coats (breed dependent), firm teeth and playful movements. For best judging results choose a calf with a long deep body. Ensure it walks a nice straight line and if a dairy type calf check to make sure it only has four teats.

If possible avoid purchasing calves from the sale yards as they will have been exposed to numerous bugs and viruses. Calves purchased at the sale yards should be checked over particularly well.

Take note of your calf's date of birth. This is required on your entry form.

If a bull calf is chosen he should be rung with a rubber ring within the first 3 weeks to become a steer, otherwise he may become aggressive as he reaches maturity. Ensure both testicles are down before releasing the ring when you ring your calf.

Feeding

Feed a newly arrived calf electrolytes only for the first 12 hours after arrival. This can help prevent stomach upsets from stress and change of milk feed (e.g. cow's milk to milk powder).


Various calf milk powders are available from farming outlet stores that will meet the needs of your calf. (Profarm in Papakura, Wrightsons, RD1 or Farmlands in Pukekohe). Choose a brand that contains an anticoccidial and avoid the cheaper brands as they can potentially provide less nutrients and that will affect the growth of your calf. Mixing and feeding instructions are clearly written on the bag, follow these carefully. Avoid sudden changes in the type (brand), quantity or temperature of milk or milk powder. Once your calf is drinking well feed at the upper limits of the recommendation so it grows well. For best results milk feed your calf twice a day until 3 weeks old then once a day until 10 week old, minimum. Supplement the milk with a high quality calf meal from a young age to encourage rumen development. Chaffage or hay can also be offered and ensure your calf has access to fresh, clean water every day. Allow to graze on reasonably long grass everyday once it is over two weeks of age.


Approx Rearing Needs

2 to 3 20kg bags of milk powder.

Calf teats are available that attach to a coke bottle or alternately a complete re-usable bottle and teat or calf feeder that hangs on a fence can be purchased. Pellets or meal from 1 week. Halter, lead and brush. Drench and vaccine.

Cover - hessian or plastic (optional).


Prevention Of Scours

  • Ensure the calf has had 2 litres of colostrum within 6 hours of birth.

  • Minimise stress and chilling during sale and transport.

  • House in a dry, draft free, hygienic shed.

  • Avoid sudden changes in the type, quantity or temperature of milk or milk powder.

  • After significant transport feed electrolytes for the first 12 hours.

Scours

If your calf scours:


DAY ONE:

  • Stop feeding it milk immediately and keep it off milk for 24-36 hours.

  • Feed it 2 litres of electrolyte mix 3 times daily to keep it hydrated. Electrolyte mix is available in small pack sizes from your local farm store or vet and are always good to have on hand when rearing an Ag Day animal.

  • Give it a scour treatment (an easily given oral is scourban, available from your vet)

  • Keep it in a clean, dry, drought-free environment and keep warm (put a calf cover on if available).


DAY TWO:

  • If calf is still scouring after 36 hours feed it 2 litres of electrolyte, followed 20-30 minutes later by 1-1.5 litres of milk.

  • Repeat 2 times daily until scouring resolves at which point stop electrolyte.

  • At the next feed, resume milk feeding.

  • If your calf stops suckling it is seriously ill. Consult your vet.

Vaccination And Drenching

Your calf should also be vaccinated with a 5 in 1 vaccine at 4 weeks of age and then given a booster shot 1 month later, with a third dose after it is three months old and thereafter once a year. This vaccine prevents pulpy kidney disease, tetanus, black disease, malignant oedema and blackleg.


Drench for worms from 6-8 weeks old unless otherwise advised by your vet. Pour-ons (down back bone - from base of neck to top of tail) are the easiest method. Other options are oral or injected. If applying pour-on it is best to sit the calf on its tail and apply from the brisket to the groin to avoid the risk of coat damage.


Lice Control

Lice are a common problem. The pour-on drenches also control lice, but it is necessary to brush the lice eggs from the coat. Washing with Asuntol twice at weekly intervals, plus brushing is also effective. If your calf gets lice you also need to wash its cover and brush in Asuntol. Keep infected calves and gear away from other calves.

Housing Requirements

A good clean, dry, and draught-free environment is required for optimum health when they are very young. Even as they get older the calf will benefit from having shelter available. A cover, even used only at night, will assist in your calf's growth as it will not be using energy to keep warm.

Daily Care

  • Regular Feeding (twice daily for best growth).

  • Wash its face to remove any milk residue.

  • Walk it on a halter and lead and spend time with it.

  • Brush it a least once a day.

  • Wash if necessary (avoid doing this often as it removes the natural oils).

Ear Tag Requirements

Your calf must have two tags, one in each ear. These are available from your local farming store or alternately the farmer you obtained your calf from may tag them for you.

De-Horning

Certain cattle breeds will grow horns. These can be dealt with quite easily and inexpensively when the calf is young. MAF (in Pukekohe) will come to your home and de-horn your calf using a gas torch to burn off the horn stubs. This is humane, quick and effective at a very reasonable cost per animal.


Alternately there are dehorning pastes available from farming outlet stores or vets that need to be applied regularly over a period of time to remove the horn bud.

Points To Remember

  • Ensure long hair under its tail is kept clean (no dags).

  • Do not clip or shave your calf - a clipped calf is disqualified.

  • Brush your calf often to get a nice shiny finish on the coat and remove loose hair.

  • Ensure the halter is loosened regularly or removed so it is not too tight, otherwise it will wear the hair off around its neck.


Judging

The children compete in the following age groups.

Junior - 5 to under 8 on the 1st of November.

Intermediate - 8 to under 11 on the 1st of November.

Senior - 11 and over on the 1st of November.

Ribbons are presented for 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th in each of the three age groups - Junior, Intermediate and Senior. Then an overall winner is chosen based on judging points in the following categories.

Rearing and condition of your calf - the date of birth of the calf and breed will be taken into account when assessing growth. An under-condition or unhealthy calf will be penalised. The judge is looking for a sleek and well groomed appearance of coat and good skin condition - not harsh dry or tight.

Leading - your calf needs to walk through the course without dragging or pushing,

elbowing, slapping or using the lead to slap, releasing the grip on the lead with the right hand or jerking the halter.

Ribbons are also presented for 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th over all age groups for the following

categories.

Dairy type


Beef type

Tips For Success

  • The child should always feed the calf. Mum or dad can assist younger children if needed.

  • Give your calf a treat when leading. Use the pellets or they often like bread (save the crusts and stale bread). Even a hug, pat and a few kind words are beneficial.

  • Spend lots of time with your calf so you build a bond.

  • Set a course up at home and walk your calf daily. Make sure you include a fence post or piece of wood so the calf gets used to stepping over it. They mustn't touch the wood.

  • When leading the right hand should grip the lead, palm upwards and be some 15cms from the halter. The left hand should grip the lead, knuckles upwards. Stand beside the left shoulder of the calf at all times. Try to keep the calf moving at a reasonable pace, but you should walk at the same pace as your calf.

  • Wash your calf on or before Ag Day and take a bucket, brushes, an old towel to clean it if it is dirty when you arrive and its food and water requirements for the day.

  • Your child should know the breed, age and general feeding requirements (how many times a day it is being fed, what it likes) of the calf as some judges will ask.


Ag Day Projects

All student not entering an animal in Ag Day must complete a project. The projects are not onerous but do require the students to put time into them. Any questions, please speak with your child's teachers.

Click here for the Year 0-2 Project

Click here for the Year 3-4 Project

Click here for the Year 5-8 Project

Ag Day Grocery Raffle

As part of Ag Day there is a Grocery Raffle. Each week starting in Week 3 we ask for grocery items to be sent along to school. The following is what we will be asking your to send along and when

  • Week 3 - Bottled products

  • Week 4 - Packet foods

  • Week 5 - Canned food

  • Week 6 - Jars and preserves

  • Week 7 - Bathroom and laundry products

  • Week 8 - Specialist

  • Week 9 - Anything